Male Cancer Awareness Week 2019

The eleventh annual Orchid Male Cancer Awareness Week took place between the 2nd – 8th September 2019. The focus of this year’s campaign was prostate cancer.

Diagnosis of late-stage prostate cancer reaches all time high.  As the latest figures show that 42.5% of men are diagnosed with late stage prostate cancer (stages iii or iv),  Orchid is calling for men and healthcare professionals to FACE up to the disease.  For the full Press Release details and stats please scroll further down this page.

‘F.A.C.E. up to prostate cancer’ is a campaign to encourage men to think about and be aware of four key risk factors associated with the development of prostate cancer:

    • Family history – having a brother or father with prostate cancer may double a man’s risk compared to men with no family history of the disease
    • Age – the older a man gets the greater the risk, with prostate cancer most commonly affecting men over the age of 50
    • Change in urinary habits – changes in urinary habits are not always a sign of prostate cancer but they can be a symptom
    • Ethnicity – black African and black Caribbean men are at double the risk of developing prostate cancer than other men and may develop the disease earlier too, most commonly affecting men from this group over 45

The campaign encouraged men who are affected by any of these risk factors to consider having a conversation with their GP about prostate cancer and urged anyone who experiences a change in urinary habits and thinks they are at risk to seek medical advice. ‘F.A.C.E. up to prostate cancer’ posters are still available as part of the free Orchid Male Cancer Awareness Week resource pack.

To mark the Week the following activities took place:

Orchid’s popular community Male Cancer Awareness Roadshows visited sites across the UK including Carlisle, Scarborough and Grimsby.

A Male Cancer Awareness Week 2019 poster was available as part of the free Orchid Male Cancer Awareness Week resource pack.

The Orchid Broadgate Tower Abseil on Saturday, 7 September was a thrill of a lifetime. At 33 storeys and 540ft high, Broadgate Tower is one of the tallest buildings in London and offers participants fantastic views across the city and an unforgettable experience. This event raised funds to help continue Orchid’s fight against male cancer.

The Great North Run is the largest half marathon in the world. On Sunday 8 September Orchid runners joined thousands of other participants to take in the spectacular, iconic locations between Newcastle upon Tyne and South Shields.

Across the UK people were busy raising awareness of the Week and male cancers. Running information sessions, putting up posters and leaflets, talking to the media about a personal experience of male cancer and fundraising were just some of the activities taking place.

A free Male Cancer Awareness Week resource pack was available.

Press Release Information

Diagnosis of late-stage prostate cancer reaches all-time high

As the latest figures show that 42.5% of diagnoses of prostate cancer are made in the late stages (stages iii or iv) [i], men’s cancer charity Orchid is calling for men and healthcare professionals to FACE up to the disease.

The latest figures follow a 5-year trend and are coupled with statistics from a survey [ii], commissioned by Orchid, released for Male Cancer Awareness Week (2nd – 8th September) and highlight that awareness of prostate cancer risk factors amongst GPs is worryingly low, particularly in relation to ethnicity and family history:

      • Only 5% named ethnicity as a primary risk factor, despite black African and black Caribbean men being twice as likely to develop the disease as other men
      • Less than half of all GPs surveyed recognised that family history and age are risk factors, despite family history potentially doubling a man’s risk and incidence being highest in the over 50’s
      • 15% of GPs mistakenly thought infections such as HPV were a primary risk factor for prostate cancer

Orchid’s Chief Executive (at the time), Rebecca Porta is calling on GPs to consider prostate cancer risk even before men present with symptoms. “We know from previous research that 60% of men are not confident in recognising the symptoms of prostate cancer and 31% have no knowledge of the disease so the GP-patient interface is essential to reverse the continued increase in late stage diagnosis.  Whilst we appreciate that GP time is limited, we urge them to incorporate a prostate cancer awareness discussion into every consultation with at-risk men”.

Late diagnosis can reduce chances of survival, limit treatment options or result in more invasive interventions. Orchid’s F.A.C.E. up to prostate cancer campaign is therefore encouraging GPs, men and their families to be aware of four key risk factors and for men and their family doctor to discuss any concerns in order to achieve earlier stage diagnosis.

Family history – having a brother or father with prostate cancer may double a man’s risk compared to men with no family history of the disease.

Age – the older a man gets the greater the risk, with prostate cancer most commonly affecting men over the age of 50.

Change in urinary habits – changes in urinary habits are not always a sign of prostate cancer but they can be a symptom.

Ethnicity – black African and black Caribbean men are at double the risk of developing prostate cancer than other men and may develop the disease earlier too, most commonly affecting men from this group over 45.

[i] National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service (2019) Stage breakdown by CCG 2017: TNM stage group by CCG by tumour type for 10+3 tumour types, 2012-2017 Available at: http://www.ncin.org.uk/publications/survival_by_stage (Accessed: 12 August 2019).

[ii] Orchid – Fighting Male Cancer. (Aug. 2019). Prostate Cancer: Survey of GPs. Censuswide. The survey was conducted from a sample of 100 UK GPs. Censuswide abide by and employ members of the Market Research Society which is based on the ESOMAR principles.

 

 

GP responses to the question: In your opinion, what are the primary risk factors associated with prostate cancer that men should be most aware of?

 

Notes to Editors

Orchid presents the latest data regarding prostate cancer in its annual ‘Prostate Cancer: Situation Report 2019’ which was published during Orchid’s Male Cancer Awareness Week (2nd – 8th September 2019).

[1] National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service (2019) Stage breakdown by CCG 2017: TNM stage group by CCG by tumour type for 10+3 tumour types, 2012-2017 Available at: http://www.ncin.org.uk/publications/survival_by_stage (Accessed: 12 August 2019).

[1] Orchid – Fighting Male Cancer. (Aug. 2019). Prostate Cancer: Survey of GPs. Censuswide. The survey was conducted from a sample of 100 UK GPs. Censuswide abide by and employ members of the Market Research Society which is based on the ESOMAR principles.

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